Tag Archives: Broadway Auto Row

Want a better Broadway? Join me this Thursday

4 Apr

As I’ve written here before, one of the reasons my wife and I moved so close to Broadway auto row was because of the hope we had for the future growth of the neighborhood. Broadway has grown quite a bit on its own over the past few years, with Shashamane, Z Cafe, Mua, and Mimosa paving the way, and NEX and 3000 Broadway opening more recently (and from what I can see, doing very well). Soon, the Parkway might open on Broadway, which would bring quite a bit of foot traffic to the area. But there are still plenty of vacant storefronts on Broadway, tons of surface parking lots, and basically zero retail except for Grocery Outlet and a couple liquor stores.

The City has been working on a specific plan for Broadway auto row and the Valdez triangle for the past several years, but their proposed plans leave much to be desired. I attended a community meeting in 2010 where the alternatives were discussed, and it didn’t seem like anyone in the room liked any of the alternatives. Among other problematic aspects, all of the alternatives included absurd amounts of parking.

It’s easy to be compelled to just throw your hands up and determine that this specific plan is doomed, but the Greenbelt Alliance and several other organizations have taken the more difficult and productive route of working on alternative plans for the future of Boradway-Valdez. And this Thursday evening, they’ll be unveiling those plans at the old dealership space next to Z Cafe. Continue reading

Upper Broadway – the perfect home for the New Parkway

25 Feb

Yesterday, Temescal resident Karen Hester wrote about the Temescal location the New Parkway is considering, and I agree that Temescal would be a great location for the theater. But you know where would be just as good or even better – the other location the New Parkway is considering on Upper Broadway, the old Audi dealership at 2345 Broadway.

Even though I walk or bus past this building everyday, I had a hard time figuring out exactly which building it was (there are a lot of vacant spaces in that area) so I thought I’d share some photos to orient folks who might be as confused as I was. Continue reading

Christopher Waters: Oakland’s growing pains: preservation and progress

2 Feb

This guest post was written by Christopher Waters, a North Oakland resident and founder of the Nomad Café. He serves on numerous boards, commissions and community groups in Oakland, including the Broadway/Valdez Area Specific Plan stakeholder group.

As a member of Oakland’s Broadway/Valdez Area Specific Plan stakeholder group, I was on the list of recipients, on January 27, 2010, of an email from Naomi Schiff, representing the Oakland Heritage Alliance’s Preservation Committee, in which a letter from OHA was attached that rejected all three of the current proposed plan alternatives for the Broadway/Valdez Area.  Her email, and the letter, are reproduced below, followed by my response, which was also sent to the entire stakeholder group.  As the Broadway/Valdez Specific Plan is a public process with publicly-noticed meetings, this email exchange sent to the entire stakeholder group is now a matter of public record.

From: Naomi Schiff
Sent: Wednesday, January 27, 2010 4:40 PM
To: Broadway/Valdez Area Specific Plan Stakeholders Group
Subject: Re: Oakland Heritage Alliance: Broadway Valdez area specific plan

Dear Staff members, consultants, policymakers, stakeholders, and community members,

Oakland Heritage Alliance held a meeting of its Preservation Committee to discuss the most recent Broadway Valdez materials, and the discussion of potential development alternatives.

Attached is a letter reflecting our responses. Some of our members will also attend the public meeting on the 28th.

We look forward to further productive and creative discussion, and hope that our views will be given consideration as we move ahead.

Thank you so much,

Naomi Schiff representing OHA Preservation Committee

­­

My response follows below.  Note that many of the supporting ideas and comments contained herein are those of my more learned colleague, Temescal resident and ULTRA founder John Gatewood.

First, we reject the canard that Existing Building = Green Building.  A building that sits empty for decades because it is ill-suited for any purpose other than its original one is not green. It is a waste of resources and a waste of valuable land at an in-fill site. Furthermore, many existing buildings are tremendously energy inefficient, with retrofits (if even possible) sometimes virtually no more cost-effective than new construction, and often even more bureaucratically cumbersome.  We strongly support adaptive re-use for individual in-fill projects, but the very nature and extent of the densification proposed for this multiple-parcel project severely inhibits realistic re-use opportunities.

As for the bureaucratic cost: does OHA support modifying our building codes to make it easier to re-use old structures without having to bring them up to modern code (safety code is a given, but what about electrical, plumbing and seismic)?  What are the incentives OHA envisions that will encourage re-use of these buildings while still achieving the primary goal of massively enhancing Oakland’s retail tax base? Saying it could be done is just talk. We would like to see a detailed action plan from OHA that will actually facilitate this.

Preservationist groups have a frustrating tendency to fail to state where the money is going to come from for their ideas. Everyone has ideas; the real question is: how are you going to pay for them — and how are you going to implement them?  Unfortunately the usual answer is: “Let’s make someone else pay!” — the City, the State, the Feds, the developers, the big businesses (the usual suspects).  And yes, those entities should pay: the city and state via redevelopment funds or grants, developers through mitigation fees, big businesses through taxes, etc. But before we can take such ideas seriously, we need to have it spelled out who pays and how they pay. Otherwise it’s just talk, and nothing more.

OHA’s proposed businesses sound very cute for a college town but will not generate anywhere near the retail tax base our city needs. We actually chuckled when we read that part of the OHA letter. We love bicycles, and we love bicycle repair shops, but the tax revenue from it ain’t gonna pay for 1 more beat cop.  OHA’s list of suggested possible businesses for this project is striking in its disconnection from economic reality.  The tax revenue generated by the enterprises they propose will be very, very small. Yes, there must be a mix of businesses, large and small, but strictly small start-ups like those OHA proposes will not generate very much revenue. Take the example of Fourth Street in Berkeley: those are small businesses or small outposts of large chain retail, but they are medium to high end (frou-frou, in official parlance) businesses. That’s why it works as destination retail and as a revenue source for Berkeley. IF OHA had discussed that model we could take it seriously — but they do not. What they propose sounds like something from the 1970’s.

Wearing her OHA hat, Naomi, at our last public meeting, held up the Oakland Whole Foods/Cox Cadillac remodel as a “victory” for historic preservation. However, it’s important to understand that this project was a “facadectomy,” in which a historic façade is preserved and a whole new building is essentially built behind it.  The Whole Foods (which, along with the Downtown Oakland YMCA, I frequent) is a welcome and important defining point for what will be the edge of this retail-dense area (especially in Valdez Alternative #3, my favored — and the highest-density — alternative, which uses 24th Street as the primary retail spine), but it is certainly not a “historic preservation” so much as a “historic reference.”  There will be many, many opportunities for such historic references within this development area — and we support such historic references (by the way, the design team does, too).  We certainly find the juxtaposition of truly new and truly historic bolder and more visually engaging than the more frequently-seen preservationist alternative: the juxtaposition of old and faux-old.  Thanks to the squeaky wheel of preservationists, developers often take the path of least resistance and what we get is another faux Tuscan Villa!  How exciting — not.

By the way: the design team has pointed out that there are many, many historic attributes that could not be preserved with a simple “façadectomy” — many of these are foyers, arches, and other unique design components that reside on the interiors of buildings with humdrum or otherwise historically insignificant exteriors.  The public would never notice the loss of most of these “internal” historic resources, if removed.  But again, with a large-scale redevelopment effort like this one, the best way to save those “internal” resources is for groups like OHA to work with the developers (if we ever reach the development stage) to identify creative ways to retain certain historic interior design elements and enhance their redevelopment goals at the same time.

The list of “failed” redevelopment projects in the appendix to the OHA letter completely ignores the major demographic changes Oakland has gone thru since the post-WWII era.  We cannot have a discussion about development — both past and future — without first looking at these changes.  Oakland is a Rust Belt city; the loss of Oakland’s industrial base and the well-paying blue collar jobs that base generated did and continues to do enormous damage to our city.

We need more people living and working in Oakland.  If we are ever to recover from being a Rust Belt city we need more residents, which, we hope, will generate more jobs. So we support the highest density proposals: Valdez Alternative #3, and North End Alternative 1 or 2 or some variation thereon. But if the City of Oakland succeeds in identifying a master developer for one or both areas, we would encourage the use of different architects for different parts of each portion of the project, in order to mix it up a little. The Bay Area is far too conservative architecturally and we need to get bold.

There is no reason dense development has to conflict with pedestrian/bike/transit orientation, design appeal, or a sense of comfort or safety.  But one thing is for certain: if we can’t attract large enough and dense enough retail in the first place, these later important tweaks and enhancements will be moot and therefore impossible.

I don’t have comment on specific historic structures at this point, with the exception of the long-defunct space-age diner (originally Biff’s and later JJ’s) at 26th and Broadway.  I don’t see Biff’s (which is a contributing structure, not a designated historic resource) as an important historic resource, and I see it as harking back to the golden age of the automobile.  The whole point is to transform “auto row” into a higher, better use.  Biff’s is a rather mediocre example of its style , and we feel there are other structures in the Bay Area that are much better examples of Googie architecture.  And again, it is an example of the type of auto-centric structure we are trying to get away from (low-rise building in back and big parking lot in front).

If you balk at the removal of any potentially historic stock, or if you have a vision of the Broadway/Valdez redevelopment as a “historic streetcar suburb” like Berkeley, then of course you will be dissatisfied with all of the proposed alternatives.  You first have to decide whether you support the broad concept of what is being proposed here:  dense comparison retail designed to stimulate Oakland’s desperately flagging retail tax base.  The market analysis shows that Oakland exports roughly $1 billion in potential retail sales to neighboring cities due to our lack of destination retail infrastructure.  This $1 billion may be unquantifiable, but suffice it to say it is massively lacking, and we have already established that OHA’s proposed list of businesses won’t come anywhere close to filling the void.  If you accept the basic premise that a large-scale shopping destination (with major retail anchors and an abundance of minor and other retail) is sorely needed, there are certain realities that come with that:

  • Broadway is the logical (and the only real viable) location (ref: the “Upper Broadway Strategy” Conley report), due to good freeway access; availability of transit service; proximity to a rejuvenated downtown/uptown; the availability of so many contiguous parcels of land due to the decline in automotive sales and repair uses; adjacency to Kaiser and Summit/Alta Bates campuses; and Broadway’s significance as Oakland’s “main street.”
  • Parking.  I am no parking advocate, but no major retail store will come to a place that doesn’t come close to meeting its parking demands.  These project proposals are already at the very lowest end of what major retail demands, but at this stage it is only a placeholder and, again, demand will have to be determined by a master developer in conjunction with the realities on the ground as they emerge over time.  The public will no doubt (rightly so) influence this process, just as we will need to influence the decision-making around availability of, and/or improvements to, transit infrastructure.  But if there is no tax base coming into Oakland, how will major transit infrastructure improvements be paid for (or how will bond measures, etc. be justified)?

Lastly: the OHA letter encourages light-industrial use of the “historic” auto row structures along Broadway.  We believe a vision for light industry along Broadway patently contradicts the intention of this plan.  Surely OHA doesn’t seriously believe that the adjacent neighborhoods in this retail area, once it is redeveloped, will want to see light industry right next door?

Common ground:

  • we share the notion that TDRs (Transferable Development Rights) could be a good way to achieve some of the preservationists’ goals while still achieving a higher-density neighborhood.  Using the Biff’s site (which I don’t advocate preserving) as a simple example:  it could arguably be zoned for 45 feet and 1 housing unit/450 square feet of lot area on the entire site; BUT, in exchange for preserving the Biff’s building, the height and density would be transferred from it to the parking lot in front, allowing development of a higher and denser project in front of it.
  • we agree that North End Alternative #3 offers a single-level, single-use big-box format retail that is inconsistent with a smart growth vision for Oakland.
  • we support establishing workforce housing options as part of the new stock.
  • we support connecting the retail district to 19th Street BART via shuttles, tram or dedicated bus service, until or unless the infrastructure exists for a new district-specific BART/light-rail stop.
  • we suggest exploring, with the individual developers, all the parking mitigation options like un-bundling parking from residential units, creation of bike parking infrastructure, etc.

I encourage citizens and stakeholders to take these contrasting points into consideration when reviewing the positions of the Oakland Heritage Alliance.

January 25-31 Oakland Political & Community Events

24 Jan

Monday, January 25th – The Future of Oakland and the School Board

Via the League of Women Voters: “The excellence of Oakland’s schools directly ties into the health of our city. Youth who graduate from high school with skills to continue their educations, fill jobs, and contribute to their neighborhoods will not be adding to our national reputation as a top-tier crime scene. What is the role of our school board in promoting OUSD student achievement? How does our school board support effective principals and teachers and personalized learning environments for OUSD students? LWVO invites its members and the larger community to attend this gathering. School Director and LWVO member Jody London will join us in a discussion of issues.” This event will take place from 6:30-8pm at Redwood Heights Community Center, 3883 Aliso Avenue (Just off Redwood Road near Highway 13).

Tuesday, January 26th – Temescal Neighborhood BRT Meeting

Oakland is preparing its recommendation for a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system running through the heart of the East Bay from San Leandro through Oakland to Berkeley. Throughout the month of January the city will be seeking the input of Oakland residents on what they want to see from the Bus Rapid Transit program and how they want this new service to run through their communities. This process will culminate in the submittal of Oakland’s Locally Preferred Alternative to AC Transit to be included in the range of options they consider when they build the BRT system. I was lucky enough to get a sneak preview of Oakland’s plan at December’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee meeting, and it’s pretty astounding, especially the significant pedestrian improvements. This meeting is part of a series of seven meetings throughout Oakland, and I highly recommend attending at least one to see the plan for yourself and to ask questions. This meeting will be held from 6-8 PM at Faith Presbyterian Church, 430 49th St. You can read more about the BRT proposal at dto510’s excellent post about this issue and at OaklandBRT.com.

Wednesday, January 27th – MTC Vote on Oakland Airport Connector & Rally for Justice and Jobs

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) will vote this Wednesday on whether to reallocate $70 million in stimulus funds, since the Federal Transportation Administration (FTA) is withholding these funds from BART for the Oakland Airport Connector until BART conducts a full equity study of the project. BART likely does not have enough time to comply – if the study isn’t completed and the funding isn’t approved before March 5, the $70 million in stimulus funding will leave the Bay Area forever and be redistributed to another region. Join us on Wednesday to tell the MTC to redistribute the funds to BART, Muni, AC Transit, and other transit agencies for maintenance. These funds would be hugely helpful to these agencies, all of which are facing huge budget deficits. At 9:00am, meet outside of MTC headquarters, 101 Eighth Street to Rally for Justice and Jobs. Then, at 9:45am, speak at the MTC meeting to urge them not to gamble the region’s funds. For more information on Wednesday’s rally and vote, or to send an email to MTC commissioners, visit TransForm’s action page.

Wednesday, January 27th – Insight Prison Project Kick-Off Celebration

From OneCalifornia Bank: “Insight Prison Project and OneCalifornia Bank invite you to attend the Insight Out Kick-Off Party. Insight Out is a bold new initiative that employs a select team of ex-offenders to work with youth to prevent crime and promote healing in Bay Area communities.” Come to this event to learn more about this new project. There will also be a performance by local youth group and appetizers and drinks will be served. The event will be held from 5-7pm at OneCalifornia Bank, 1438 Webster Street, Suite 100. Find out more at the event web page.

Wednesday, January 27th – Downtown Area BRT Meetings

Oakland is preparing its recommendation for a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system running through the heart of the East Bay from San Leandro through Oakland to Berkeley. Throughout the month of January the city will be seeking the input of Oakland residents on what they want to see from the Bus Rapid Transit program and how they want this new service to run through their communities. This process will culminate in the submittal of Oakland’s Locally Preferred Alternative to AC Transit to be included in the range of options they consider when they build the BRT system. I was lucky enough to get a sneak preview of Oakland’s plan at December’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee meeting, and it’s pretty astounding, especially the significant pedestrian improvements. These meeting are part of a series of seven meetings throughout Oakland, and I highly recommend attending at least one to see the plan for yourself and to ask questions. These meeting will be held from 11am-1pm in Hearing Room 2 and 5-7pm in Hearing Room 4 at Oakland City Hall, 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza. You can read more about the BRT proposal at dto510’s excellent post about this issue and at OaklandBRT.com.

Thursday, January 28th – Broadway Auto Row Planning Meeting

This will be the third in a series of meetings to help plan the revitalization of Broadway Auto Row. At this meeting, project alternatives will be presented. If you’re interested in this corridor (and you should be), please attend this meeting. It will be held from 6-8pm at First Presbyterian Church, 2619 Broadway at 27th. More info on the Auto Row planning process can be found here.

Thursday, January 28th – Walk Oakland Bike Oakland Meeting

This meeting is your chance to meet the newest member of the WOBO family – Kassie Rohrback, WOBO’s first Executive Director! Kassie will be at the Volunteer Meeting to introduce herself, answer your questions, and – with the help of WOBO campaign leaders – give you an update on what campaigns they’re actively running, where they stand, and how you can help out in 2010. Since this meeting is designed to be your chance to get acquainted with Kassie and WOBO’s campaigns, there will be time (and refreshments) after the meeting, so you can get more information about their campaigns and sign up to volunteer. This meeting will be held from 6:30-8:30 pm at Bay Area Wilderness Training, 2301 Broadway, Suite B – enter on 23rd Street. For more info, visit WOBO’s website.

Thursday, January 28th – Elmhurst Neighborhood BRT Meeting

Oakland is preparing its recommendation for a Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) system running through the heart of the East Bay from San Leandro through Oakland to Berkeley. Throughout the month of January the city will be seeking the input of Oakland residents on what they want to see from the Bus Rapid Transit program and how they want this new service to run through their communities. This process will culminate in the submittal of Oakland’s Locally Preferred Alternative to AC Transit to be included in the range of options they consider when they build the BRT system. I was lucky enough to get a sneak preview of Oakland’s plan at December’s Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee meeting, and it’s pretty astounding, especially the significant pedestrian improvements. This meeting is the last in a series of seven meetings throughout Oakland, and I highly recommend attending at least one to see the plan for yourself and to ask questions. This meeting will be held from 6-8 PM at St. Luis Bertrand Church, 1410 100th Ave. (@ International Blvd). You can read more about the BRT proposal at dto510’s excellent post about this issue and at OaklandBRT.com.

Oakland Updates: OAC, AC Transit Passes, Auto Row & BART Police

13 Jul

I did one of these a few weeks ago and it seemed to work well so I might make this a regular feature. I’d love to hear feedback on whether these brief updates are interesting to you or not.

The ongoing Oakland Airport Connector saga: (Disclosure: I was recently hired to work part time on a short term basis for TransForm on the Oakland Airport Connector campaign.) As you might have seen on TV or in the newspaper last week, Don Perata headlined a press conference last week before the MTC committee meeting decrying the Oakland Airport Connector. Advocates felt we had a really good chance at this committee hearing, but, unfortunately, the committee lost quorum after they had a long closed session and then plenty of public comment. We were pretty surprised when MTC Chair Scott Haggerty appointed other commissioners to the committee at the last moment so they could get to quorum to move the funding discussion to their full commission meeting on July 22. That meeting may be one of our last chances to alter this project so put it on your calendar now.

As I mentioned yesterday in the events listing, the Public Works Committee of the Oakland City Council will be discussing the OAC tomorrow. RSVP on Facebook to attend and speak out against this wasteful project and in favor of alternatives.

And if you’re wondering what could be done with all the money saved from building BRT instead of an overhead connector, 21st Century Urban Solutions has a great post up about using the funds to build an infill station in San Antonio, between the Lake Merritt and Fruitvale stations.

What to do with old AC Transit passes: It’s time to rummage through your stuff and find old AC Transit 10 ride and 31 day passes because they’ll only be usable through September 30th. Ride ACT has a comprehensive post about how to use these passes, but the short story is that the 31 day passes are usable as is and with the 10 ride passes, you’ll need to add $0.25 to complete your fare. Also, if you have entirely unused passes sitting around, you can go to the AC Transit office and exchange those for fare on a Translink card.

Background on the Broadway Auto Row planning porcess: Though I couldn’t make it to last week’s meeting about the Broadway Auto Row planning process, I still feel very informed because of three thorough blog posts. V Smoothe wrote a post previewing the meeting and describing existing conditions on the corridor, complete with detailed maps. City Homestead featured two posts on the subject, one covering the history of Auto Row and the other discussing possible models to follow for planning the future of Auto Row.

Voice your opinions on BART police: The National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives (NOBLE) is conducting an independent study of the BART Police Department as commissioned by BART. As part of this study, they’ve set up an online survey to solicit feedback from the community about BART police. You can take the brief survey here.

July 6-12 Oakland Political & Community Events

5 Jul

Monday, July 6th – Musical Mondays at Jack London Square – Carlos Godinez

This summer, Jack London Square is holding a two month series of Musical Mondays. Jack London Square hosts live musical entertainment to enjoy while playing favorite board games. Check out chess, checkers, scrabble and much more. Build up an appetite and check out the prefix dinner menus that the JLS restaurants will feature to help you ease into another work week. This event will be held from 5:30-8:00 pm at the foot of Broadway in Jack London Square.

Tuesday, July 7th – Oakland City Council Meeting

Finally, the budget discussions are over (for now), and the Council can move on to a myriad of other important issues, and judging from the lengthy agenda, they have a lot to catch up on. Among other items, they’ll be discussing updates to Central Business District Zoning, the MacArthur Transit Village, many stimulus grant applications, and civilianization of internal affairs of the police department. See the full meeting agenda and check out my post about how to watch and understand City Council meetings if you need some guidance on how or where to view the meeting. The non-ceremonial parts of the meeting start at 7pm at the Council Chambers in City Hall, 1 Frank Ogawa Plaza.

Wednesday, July 8th – Oaktown Meetup

This event will highlight numerous non profits and volunteer based organizations in Oakland that need our help. Meet representatives from each organization and learn about the type of help they need. Interested parties will have the opportunity to sign up to volunteer with these organizations on-site. This is a great opportunity to find out about the ways to help make Oakland a better place, and a unique chance to network with community service minded individuals and organizations. The event will be held from 5:00-7:30pm at Levende East, 827 Washington St. RSVP and find more info on Facebook.

Wednesday, July 8th – East Bay Democracy for America Meetup

At their July meeting, Democracy for America will be focusing on Prop 13 and recent changes in the Democratic Party. John Burton, newly elected Chair of the California Democratic Party, will be speaking about his vision for the CDP, and this will be your opportunity to meet him and ask him questions. San Francisco County Assesor Phil Ting will then be discussing his “Close the Loophole” campaign to create greater equity in our tax system, shut down corporate tax loopholes and bring back fiscal sanity to the California budget. The meeting will be held at 6:30 at the Rockridge Library, 5366 College Avenue. RSVP here.

Thursday, July 9th – Mix It Up East Bay Two Year Anniversary Party

Join us for a monthly happy hour bringing together young activists, organizers and leaders in the East Bay. This month will be extra special and fun because it’s Mix It Up’s Two Year Anniversary Party. There will be free food, a raffle, and drink specials. Mix It Up East Bay is held every 2nd Thursday of the month from 6-9pm at Shashamane at 2507 Broadway. It’s accessible by 19th Street BART station or by AC Transit lines 1/1R, 51, 59.

Thursday, July 9th – Broadway Auto Row Planning Meeting

Ugh, I really, really want to go to one of these meetings but they keep conflicting with other events! So I hope one of you will attend and tell me all about it. This will be the second in a series of meetings to help plan the revitalization of Broadway Auto Row. This meeting will focus on existing conditions and a market demand report. If you’re interested in this corridor (and you should be), please attend this meeting. It will be held from 6-8pm at First Presbyterian Church, 2619 Broadway at 27th. And when it’s done, walk down to Shashamane to join the Mix It Up party. More info on the Auto Row planning process can be found here.

Friday, July 10th – Estuary Art Attack

First Fridays are not the only day of the month to check out art galleries. Jingle Town and Alameda artists have joined together to start the Estuary Art Attack, a monthly event held on second Fridays to showcase the area’s galleries, restaurants, and bars. The Art Attack will be held from 6-9 pm throughout Jingle Town and Alameda. Check out their website for more details.

Saturday, July 11th – Central Estuary Plan Community Workshop #4

This Saturday, the fourth meeting will be held for for the Central Estuary Plan, which is designed to build a vision and provide a framework to support development and enhancement of the Estuary from Adeline Street to 66th Avenue.  At this workshop, you’ll be asked to “roll up your sleeves” and participate in a mapping exercise to develop alternatives that reflect your ideas and what you’d like to see in the Central Estuary area in the future.  You will have the opportunity to present your ideas to the project team and fellow community participants. You can read about the first meet at Oakland Streets or at A Better Oakland. (The CEDA website also includes meeting presentations and other materials.) The meeting will be held from 9am-noon at Beacon Bay School, 2101 Livingston Street.